Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy addresses how the body and its parts, move within its environment – both internal and external environments– to ensure balanced physical functioning and contribute to creating optimum health. Physiotherapy addresses how movement allows energy, nutrients, waste products move through the whole body system and thus removes any blocks to this optimal movement. The therapist assists and works with the patient in removing the blocks to their self healing – as all healing is ultimately self healing.

 

What is Physiotherapy?

Physiotherapy is both an exercise and manual therapy approach to assessing and treating various symptoms which present primarily as musculoskeletal pain/dysfunction/weakness/imbalance, but can also have other non-musculoskeletal symptoms contributing solely or partially to the condition. Physiotherapy is about assessing and analysing how the body moves in space and how this is related to the symptoms that are presenting.  It can address local issues or the whole body as it interacts with the world. Symptoms may be both, acute or chronic and may even be influenced by your other medical conditions or past surgeries. Increasing research is also showing how our social situation and social context, our emotions and our mental health also can affect our physical health and vice versa. These aspects are incorporated into our assessment questioning to determine how each aspect is influencing your problems. Physiotherapy is not just about exercise. Exercise is just one aspect of the treatment. How we move and how we hold our bodies can influence our emotional and mental states, positively and negatively, as well.

Physiotherapists focus not only on how your internal environment, including cells, organs, joints, muscles, fascia, nerves and circulatory systems work together to allow your physical form to move through space but also address how the external environment may be influencing a particular problem/s. The purpose of the assessment is to find the original source/cause of the problem.  Then to address these original source causes so the condition can be healed, transformed or managed. Often the source of the issue is not where the symptoms are presenting, as our bodies are interrelated and not easily separated into separate systems and a dysfunction in one area can be being compensated for in a more distant area and also the symptoms can be being influenced by previous issues that have not been resolved. Research is showing more and more how each system of the body is interrelated and interdependent on all others to varying degrees and working out the specific combination of causes for a particular problem is vital in its ultimate resolution.

People consult physiotherapists for the following conditions

  • Chronic pain & dysfunction
  • Back pain
  • Neck pain
  • Headaches
  • Postural issues
  • Muscle strains
  • Sciatica
  • Sporting injuries
  • General joint pain
  • Tendinitis
  • Repetitive strain injuries
  • Face, jaw and head pain
  • Pre and post surgery

Sometimes your symptoms will not be musculo-skeletal but have no discovered medical cause, including:

  • Bloating
  • Sensations of tightness in the chest or trunk
  • Recurrent infections in the same area
  • Hoarseness or throat issues
  • Tachycardia
  • Other visceral symptoms without a found medical cause
  • Unusual sensations like burning or tingling

What to expect at your first appointment

A thorough health history will be taken and you will be asked about your presenting complaint and also about your past physical and medical issues, as these may or may not be contributing to the current presenting problem.  The physiotherapist will examine you and will get you to do some movement tests and other muscle, joint, nerve or fascia tests. They will then discuss with you the dysfunctions the tests uncovered and how to deliver the optimal treatment for the quickest and best functional outcome. The treatment will be individualised to your unique set of complaints.

Treatment often involves specific techniques such as Fascial Manipulation, massage or stretching of soft tissues (e.g. muscles, tendons and ligaments) and gentle mobilisation of joints, to improve movement and promote healing. Your physiotherapist may give advice on exercises, posture etc and may suggest modifying your activities to increase the treatment’s short- and long-term effectiveness. Education is also a large part of the treatment. Education in your condition and how it has manifested and how to treat it. The more knowledge you have regarding your condition the better you can self manage it and contribute to your own healing. Most physiotherapy treatment is gentle and should not cause undue discomfort. Although some techniques can be painful for a short time during the treatment application and for a short time after the sessions, but this will be explained and advised at the time. If your injuries do require hands-on treatment of painful and tender areas, your physiotherapist takes care to make you as comfortable as possible.

The physiotherapist will usually treat you on your first appointment. However, they may refer you to another medical specialist or complementary practitioner, if necessary. Due to the nature of initial consultations, you can expect more hands-on treatment on subsequent visits.

Depending on the area of your body requiring treatment, your physiotherapist may ask you to undress down to your underwear. It’s important that you feel comfortable, so you may want to wear or bring loose pants or shorts.

How long does it take to treat a condition?

Sometimes it is difficult to accurately gauge the time it will take someone to get better. Often it depends on the chronicity or complexity of the condition/s presenting. More acute and simpler cases will resolve quicker as they require less intervention and thus fewer adaptations are required within the body from the treatment. But these adaptations to the new body posture and thus new function can take some time especially if the symptoms and compensations have been present for a long time. Some patients start to notice differences at the first treatment. For example, Fascial Manipulation treatment can be quick at resolving conditions within 1-6 sessions. Occasionally more chronic and complex cases may require longer and involve a number of technique styles from the therapist. The therapist is merely assisting the patient/client to heal themselves by removing any physical blocks and this means the treatment is very much a collaboration between patient and therapist.

People consult physiotherapists for the following conditions

  • Chronic pain & dysfunction
  • Back pain
  • Neck pain
  • Headaches
  • Postural issues
  • Muscle strains
  • Sciatica
  • Sporting injuries
  • General joint pain
  • Tendinitis
  • Repetitive strain injuries
  • Face, jaw and head pain
  • Pre and post surgery

Sometimes your symptoms will not be musculo-skeletal but have no discovered medical cause, including:

  • Bloating
  • Sensations of tightness in the chest or trunk
  • Recurrent infections in the same area
  • Hoarseness or throat issues
  • Tachycardia
  • Other visceral symptoms without a found medical cause
  • Unusual sensations like burning or tingling

What to expect at your first appointment

A thorough health history will be taken and you will be asked about your presenting complaint and also about your past physical and medical issues, as these may or may not be contributing to the current presenting problem.  The physiotherapist will examine you and will get you to do some movement tests and other muscle, joint, nerve or fascia tests. They will then discuss with you the dysfunctions the tests uncovered and how to deliver the optimal treatment for the quickest and best functional outcome. The treatment will be individualised to your unique set of complaints.

Treatment often involves specific techniques such as Fascial Manipulation, massage or stretching of soft tissues (e.g. muscles, tendons and ligaments) and gentle mobilisation of joints, to improve movement and promote healing. Your physiotherapist may give advice on exercises, posture etc and may suggest modifying your activities to increase the treatment’s short- and long-term effectiveness. Education is also a large part of the treatment. Education in your condition and how it has manifested and how to treat it. The more knowledge you have regarding your condition the better you can self manage it and contribute to your own healing. Most physiotherapy treatment is gentle and should not cause undue discomfort. Although some techniques can be painful for a short time during the treatment application and for a short time after the sessions, but this will be explained and advised at the time. If your injuries do require hands-on treatment of painful and tender areas, your physiotherapist takes care to make you as comfortable as possible.

The physiotherapist will usually treat you on your first appointment. However, they may refer you to another medical specialist or complementary practitioner, if necessary. Due to the nature of initial consultations, you can expect more hands-on treatment on subsequent visits.

Depending on the area of your body requiring treatment, your physiotherapist may ask you to undress down to your underwear. It’s important that you feel comfortable, so you may want to wear or bring loose pants or shorts.

How long does it take to treat a condition?

Sometimes it is difficult to accurately gauge the time it will take someone to get better. Often it depends on the chronicity or complexity of the condition/s presenting. More acute and simpler cases will resolve quicker as they require less intervention and thus fewer adaptations are required within the body from the treatment. But these adaptations to the new body posture and thus new function can take some time especially if the symptoms and compensations have been present for a long time. Some patients start to notice differences at the first treatment. For example, Fascial Manipulation treatment can be quick at resolving conditions within 1-6 sessions. Occasionally more chronic and complex cases may require longer and involve a number of technique styles from the therapist. The therapist is merely assisting the patient/client to heal themselves by removing any physical blocks and this means the treatment is very much a collaboration between patient and therapist.

Our physiotherapist

Jo Hadley B. Phty

Call now to make an appointment:
(02) 9211 3811